A government has the obligation to lessen the economic gap between its rich and poor citizens.

This is the 2012 NFL National Championship Topic for 2012

A government has the obligation to lessen the economic gap between its rich and poor citizens.

Yes because... No because...

The Rich Poor Gap Threatens Political Equality

THB that A GOVERNMENT HAS THE OBLIGATION TO LESSEN THE ECONOMIC GAP BETWEEN ITS RICH AND POOR CITIZENS.Let the definition of poor and rich be define conceptually.The poor according to the UN nations studies is as the below facts.

Poverty in the United States

The official poverty measure is published by the United States Census Bureau and shows that:

In 2010, 46.9 million people were in poverty, up from 37.3 million in 2007 -- the fourth consecutive annual increase in the number of people in poverty . This is the largest number in the 52 years for which poverty rates have been published

The 2010 poverty rate was 15.1 percent, up from 12.5 percent in 1997. This is the highest poverty rate since 1993, but 7.3 percentage points lower than the poverty rate in 1959, the first year for poverty estimates.

The 2010 poverty rate for Hispanics was 26.6 percent, for Blacks 27.4 percent.

In 2010, the poverty rate increased for children under age 18 from 20.7 percent to 22.0 percent.

20.5 million Americans live in extreme poverty. This means their family’s cash income is less than half of the poverty line, or about $10,000 a year for a family of four

49.9 million people or 16.3 percent of the American people, do not have medical insurance

In 2011 the Census Bureau published a supplemental poverty measure for the first time (US Census Bureau 2011b). This new measure addresses seven concerns that have been raised about the official poverty measure, including the fact that the offical poverty measure does not reflect the effects of key government policies that alter the disposable income of families and thus their poverty status, such as the SNAP/food stamp program.

Taking these adjustments into account, the supplemental poverty measure showed a 3 million increase in the number of poor people in 2010, compared to the official poverty rate. Who is poor shows some striking changes. The percentage of children in poverty is 27.7 percent of the total population in poverty with the supplemental measure and 36.1 with the official measure; while people over 65 are 12.7 percent of the total population in poverty in the supplemental measure and 7.6 percent in the official measure

The supplemental poverty measure does measure poverty more accurately, and it is gratifiying to see that programs to reduce poverty and hunger among children have had an impact.

.See when there are a gap in between rich and poor , automatically they poor will need to shut their mouth.As the modern country their poverty should be in control like the development country such as Malaysia and Singapore where almost every sectors in those country is in top 5th ranking in 3rd world region specifically Asian plate.So the goverment need to use their authority not campaigning but restoring their poor need. For llight example we can use rich people such as Oprah Winfrey to help the need so that the poor see that, " Oh its okay now the communities is helping us "

A government has the obligation to lessen the economic gap between its rich and poor citizens.

Yes because... No because...

The Rich Poor Gap Silences the Political Voice of the Poor

Research has also demonstrated a connection between economic inequality and political voice. The political process is far more responsive to the claims of the privileged, and the privileged are far better organized and engaged in the political process than are less affluent citizens. Recent studies show that government officials are far more likely to support the policy preferences of the wealthy than those of the poor. In short, there is considerable evidence to suggest that there is a growing divide between those who have wealth and political influence and those who do not.
Yasmin Dawood, THE NEW INEQUALITY: CONSTITUTIONAL DEMOCRACY AND THE PROBLEM OF WEALTH, Maryland Law Review: 2007. Lexis-Nexis Databases.

A government has the obligation to lessen the economic gap between its rich and poor citizens.

Yes because... No because...

TRUE INDIVIDUAL FREEDOM CANNOT EXIST WITHOUT ECONOMIC SECURITY AND INDEPENDENCE

This Republic had its beginning, and grew to its present strength, under the protection of certain inalienable political rights—among them the right of free speech, free press, free worship, trial by jury, freedom from unreasonable searches and seizures. They were our rights to life and liberty. As our Nation has grown in size and stature, however—as our industrial economy expanded—these political rights proved inadequate to assure us equality in the pursuit of happiness. We have come to a clear realization of the fact that true individual freedom cannot exist without economic security and independence. "Necessitous men are not free men." People who are hungry and out of a job are the stuff of which dictatorships are made.
Franklin D. Roosevelt. State of the Union Message to Congress, 11 Jan 1944. http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/index.php?pid=16518#axzz1uxaxGgw4

A government has the obligation to lessen the economic gap between its rich and poor citizens.

Yes because... No because...

THE GAP BETWEEN THE RICH AND THE POOR WILL LEAD TO THE DOWNFALL OF THE POLITICAL SYSTEM

According to these philosophers, [ . . . Madison, Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, and Rousseau] extensive inequalities in wealth and power would lead to self-centered and factional behavior on the part of the upper classes, who, in an effort to protect themselves from the envy of the lower classes, would subvert the law and public office to their own ends. The disempowered majority, meanwhile, would lose their loyalty to the community and act selfishly to gain what they could. Factional conflict would not only engulf governmental functions, but also the entire citizenry. Relations between wealthy and poor citizens would become increasingly marked by polarization and violence, leading to rapid cyclings between demagogic popular politics, uprisings, anarchy, and autocratic control. Ordinary citizens would mistrust the political system so severely that they would cease to voluntarily support the primary structures of governance or to make any commitments to the common welfare.
Yasmin Dawood, The New Inequality: Constitutional Democracy And The Problem Of Wealth, Maryland Law Review: 2007. Lexis-Nexis Databases.

A government has the obligation to lessen the economic gap between its rich and poor citizens.

Yes because... No because...

STUDIES SHOW THAT WITH A LARGER GAP, THERE ARE MORE SOCIAL PROBLEMS

It is not surprising, then, that during the last bubble (from 2002 to 2006) the top 1 percent of Americans - paid mainly from the Wall Street casino - received two-thirds of the gain in national income, while the bottom 90 percent - mainly dependent on Main Street's shrinking economy - got only 12 percent. This growing wealth gap is not the market's fault. It's the decaying fruit of bad economic policy. Why concern ourselves with economic inequality, though? Speaking generally, Wilkinson and Pickett, in their recent book The Spirit Level, show that, globally, income inequality corresponds strongly with a range of societal ills. By creating an index of these societal problems, such as crime rates, and measuring them against income inequality, the authors find that nations with higher income inequality have the greatest prevalence of these social ills.
Raymond H. Brescia. The Cost of Inequality: Social Distance, Predatory Conduct, and the Financial Crisis. New York University Annual Survey of American Law: 2011.

A government has the obligation to lessen the economic gap between its rich and poor citizens.

Yes because... No because...

The topic has a universal understanding that is not US centered

This is the Best Block i Have Written in Some time:
1) VALUES AND EXAMPLES ARE UNIVERSAL
"The Lincoln Douglas resolution identifies a value dilemma. Therefore, resolutional requirements for the LD debater are very different. The major difference is that the value resolution must be upheld as a whole. Values are considered universal. Therefore, the affirmative is not allowed to focus only on one specific example of the value. Jeffery Wiese and Stan Lewis. LINCOLN-DOUGLAS DEBATE: VALUES IN CONFLICT, Perfection Learning, 2000.
2) The resolution does specify a country of focus. The framing committee has been writing topics since the Reagan Administration, and if they wanted it to be focused in the United States, they would have added those words to the topic.
3) The framing committee has used a US centered topic before - for the national tournament in 1981, the national tournament in 1985, twice in 1985, twice in 1988, twice in 1989, three times in 1990, once in 1991, twice in 1992, once in 1995, once in 1996, twice in 1997, three times in 1998 if you count the tern "Native American", and twice in 1999 - and the list goes on - this is an example of a topic that does not contain a US focus because obviously they know when the use the term and when they don't.
4) The topic clearly states "A government". As long as the affirmative does use examples of anarchy, mob rule, or commercial relationships it is well within the guise of the topic to discus a government's example.
5) The topic reaffirms the universality of the topic by including the term "its citizens". Not once but twice now, when the framing committee had a chance to make this a US focused topic they chose otherwise.
6) According to the standard rules of grammar within the English language "its" is a pronoun that refers back to the antecedent, "government" thus illustrating that the framing committee could not have made a mistake in their interpretation because this grammatical structure is only used when offering a vague reference to a simple concept.
7) The use of "government" and "its" create a logical method to calculate the rich-poor gap. The rich poor gap can be calculated between countries or a group of citizens from a country to a group of citizens in another country, but it is used in a very specific way in the economic community.
8) According to the rules established for judging by the National Forensic League in the April 1993 ROSTRUM under the heading, "A decision should be based on:" it states, "Debating the resolution in its entirety. Neither the affirmative nor the negative is to debate his or her position from the standpoint of isolated examples. Source, "Judging Rules for Lincoln Douglas Debate from the Conference on Lincoln Douglas Debate Chairman: Frank Sferra; Recorder: Pqam Cady; Rostrum, April 1993.
9) If you, as the judge follow the established rules for judging this event and I don't argue examples outside of the United States, you should vote me down - the rules are simple.
10) If my opponent fails to argue out of the scope of the United States, you should vote him down because the rule for judging also applies to the negative also. If he doesn't mention another country in his negative case, you might want to consider that as grounds for a loss.

So . . . if your opponent wants to make that argument start with one and run through them. If he can't argue them all then the round should technically go to you. Don't preempt the argument, let it come and then cram it down his throat.

A government has the obligation to lessen the economic gap between its rich and poor citizens.

Yes because... No because...

ECONOMIC INEQUALITY CAUSED THE GREAT DEPRESSION

But what relationship, if any, does economic inequality have with financial crises? In his seminal work on the Great Depression, Galbraith pointed to the severe income inequality in the United States - what he called the "bad distribution of income" - as one of the five "weaknesses" in the economy that "had an especially intimate bearing on the ensuing disaster. In 1929 the rich were indubitably rich. The figures are not entirely satisfactory, but it seems certain that the 5 per cent of the population with the highest incomes in that year received approximately one third of all personal income. The proportion of personal income received in the form of interest, dividends, and rent - the income, broadly speaking, of the well-to-do - was about twice as great as in the years following the Second World War.
Raymond H. Brescia. The Cost of Inequality: Social Distance, Predatory Conduct, and the Financial Crisis. New York University Annual Survey of American Law: 2011.

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