History, as a subject, is dying on its feet.

The subject of history has fallen out of the top 10 choices of degree subjects, being replaced by Media Studies in 2006. The decline in Britons studying one of the most important disciplines in academia is a display of apathy towards the subject as a whole and could be a sign of a mass down-trend that could affect the subject right to the core. As an undergraduate of History, it saddens me to watch my subject begin a fall to the wayside. At a time where historical research and the history of nation are affecting world politics more than ever, the participation levels will possibly lead to the degradation of the subject nationally and will have possible repercussions in the international history community.

History, as a subject, is dying on its feet.

Yes because... No because...

Fewer University applicants apply for History courses

in 2006, History was forced from the top ten degree subjects and replaced by Media studies, and has shown a general down-turn in the number of applicants.

Just because History is no longer one of the top ten degree subjects does not mean it is dying as a subject. With more and more students of different abilities studying a wider range of subjects than ever before at University level, it is inevitable there will be changes in the 'most popular' subjects. However, this does not necessarily indicate a trend towards extinction of particular subjects. It may well be that top students are still choosing academically rigorous subjects, but because they are a proportionately small group, this will not be reflected in statistics.

History, as a subject, is dying on its feet.

Yes because... No because...

History still taught in schools

The National Curriculum still calls for History to be taught to a relatively old age in schools, meaning that important historical lessons are not being sidelined in our nation's education.

Furthermore, many other subjects incorporate History to some extent into their programmes. Studying texts in English, for instance, requires some historical contextualisation.

History, as a subject, is dying on its feet.

Yes because... No because...

Russell Group vs New Universities

Oh please, most Russell Group universities don't even teach Media Studies. The fact that it has replaced history in the top-ten is a symptom of the increase in university places to include the less academically gifted. Obviously, this is a demographic who will eschew tough, written based degrees in favour of the vocational courses which are more in fitting with the nature of their institution.

I think you'll find history is as popular as ever amongst the top universities - and it is from this pool that the nation's future academics, solicitors, barristers, politicians and the majority of our teachers are drawn. So let the old polytechnics offer degrees in marketing.

Debates > History, as a subject, is dying on its feet.