Is more funding the only tool to help European Roma receive a better education?

"A newly-released European Commission report shows that for the most part, the European Union has failed to meet its educational targets over the past decade. It's an increase of almost 40 percent since 2000 - the goal was 15 percent. But for that same period, the EU made insufficient progress on the other targets - reducing drop-out rates, improving literacy and increasing the number of high school graduates and the number of adults in training. The success rates in these categories differ from country to country.

But there is one thing in common; in fact, experts note, across Europe, the Roma tend to be the most uneducated group, rarely finishing high school. For the most part, they live in segregation and are often stereotyped as criminals. Analysts say stereotyping is actually one of the main reasons why Europe's biggest minority - about 12 million people - is largely excluded from the educational system.

Analysts say the solution to this problem is complex. But, they note, one thing that could have helped Europe achieve better results on all of its educational targets is more funding." - Yaldaz Sadakova, Press TV, Brussels.

Is more funding the only tool to help European Roma receive a better education?

Yes because... No because...

Re-education of non-Roma about the Roma people

No, i do not think that more funding is the only tool to educate Roma better ... I think that more funding is necessary for re-education of non-Roma about the Roma people ... maybe helps to stop the discrimination and human rights violations and also will make respect and understanding grow !!! - Miryam Muit, mirmuit@gmail.com.

Is more funding the only tool to help European Roma receive a better education?

Yes because... No because...

You cannot buy inclusion, everyone has to want it

One of the biggest factors in Roma children's low education achievement is the fact that in many European countries, non-Roma parents go to great lengths to make sure their own children avoid Roma children. Schools desperate to keep their student numbers stable - precisely because of per capita funding mechanisms - will often resort to segregation in an effort to keep non-Roma children around instead of challenging non-Roma parents on their prejudices. Similarly, "special education" funding mechanisms often prove too tempting a financial motivator for schools to resist, and the result in many countries is that Roma children are misidentified as in need of such measures purely because their inclusion in special education is a revenue-generator for the school. The Czech School Inspection Authority recently documented such cases of fraud with respect to "special education" there. Education results for everyone will improve when non-Roma and Roma adults commit themselves to raising a generation of children that interact socially and enjoy school together.

Is more funding the only tool to help European Roma receive a better education?

Yes because... No because...

More funding may also mean more racism, more discrimination and more exclusion

If most, if not all, international initiatives towards Rromani population in Europe failed during the last 20 years, this is because of the philosophy of these initiatives. The starting point of all these initiatives is the same: "Roma are the largest and the most discriminated European minority". This definition is wrong and this is where all the problems come. In a European perspective, how can one consider 12 millions as a minority while many other European peoples are considered as "nation" even though they aren't but 2 millions, for example? Then, the discrimination most of Rroms experience is not what defines us as Rroms, but rather the consequence of what we are supposed to be, in the eyes of outsiders. Therefore, the public policies and public money spent during the last decades, while pretending fighting the exclusion and the discrimination, reinforced the racism, because social problems are "treated" in ethnic terms while ethnic identity is simply ignored and even denied. The Magyar Garda is, at least partly, a product of such blind and so-called "social policies". What is needed, is not more money, but another view on our people, that respects what we are: a nation, with a language, a history, values, potential, without state and without state claim but capable to live in harmony with other peoples everywhere and everytime that we have been given the possibility.

Debates > Is more funding the only tool to help European Roma receive a better education?