Is Hungarian Government ready for an affirmative action at home in the light of proposed European Roma Strategy?

"Last month, Prime Minister Viktor Orbán declared Roma issues a priority for the Hungarian Presidency of the European Union. He promised to work towards a “functioning Roma strategy” at EU-wide level to improve social inclusion of Roma citizens. While the Prime Minister’s pledge to enhance Roma rights across the EU is commendable, the rhetoric has done little to console Hungary’s Roma, who continue to face discrimination, including in the form of hate crime. They have been waiting for justice to be served and for Hungarian officials to lead by example when it comes to addressing the daily struggles of Roma at home. Setting aside its high rhetoric in support of Roma rights across Europe, there is much that Hungary’s government could do at home ... It’s time for the government to prove that Hungary is serious about standing up for its Roma citizens at home as it pursues initiatives at the EU level." - Paul LeGendre, Director, Fighting Discrimination Program.

 

All the Yes points

Is Hungarian Government ready for an affirmative action at home in the light of proposed European Roma Strategy?

Yes because... No because...

There is little consensus among the various stakeholders

"In December, on the eve of Hungary’s assumption of the EU presidency, the United States and Norwegian embassies sponsored a day-long symposium at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences with the stated objective of compiling a specific set of proposals for improving the plight of Hungary’s and, by extension, Europe’s Roma. The conference was attended by a number of government representatives as well as various NGOs. While there was general agreement that the Roma faced enormous challenges, there was little agreement as to what should be done. And despite the organisers’ best intentions, the conference mainly consisted of representatives of the government criticising the policies of the previous government while trying to explain the current government’s policies which had been formulated and were being implemented without consulting any of the NGOs attending the symposium. Although providing a useful forum for discussion and debate, the day long conference failed to yield any specific proposals. This was not the organisers’ fault. There is little consensus among the various stakeholders as to how to go about addressing what is not one problem, but a complex series of interrelated problems." - Richard Field, Chairman of the American House Foundation.

Debates > Is Hungarian Government ready for an affirmative action at home in the light of proposed European Roma Strategy?