Arguing is good for you.

A recent study at the University of Michigan has shown that arguing is good for your health. Essentially having the argument is better than avoiding the confrontation. Avoiding the conflict more often lead to abnormal rates of Cortisol generation, causing more physical stress symptoms the next day. On the other hand getting into the conflict can cause other problems, such as a bad reputation at work or scaring someone you love.



Arguing is good for you.
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Arguing is good for you.
Yes because...

An issue brought up quickly is solved quickly.

If nobody owns up to exactly how strongly they feel about a topic and how urgent it is that they fix it, the problem won't be solved and there will be much more stress over the long term.

No because...

A discussion doesn't have to be an argument, or Debatewise would be full of people flaming each other. It is important to be strict and not go off topic, as well as to explain how it makes you feel, but to actually be feeling the emotions at the time is counterproductive as it impedes thinking and you can make a rash decision in the heat of the moment that you regret later.

This also assumes that all triggers for arguments have clear causes which are topics that can be solved. Some people just get irritated for no apparent reason, and it might be better to avoid all their triggers in day-to-day life and get them proper counselling.

Arguing is good for you.
Yes because...

Honesty about feelings is good in dealing with others.

All relationships have problems and to pretend that there isn't a problem where there is, is only being dishonest, a negative trait that puts people off each other.

No because...

If a person is actually usually mild and a certain topic of conversation just happens to trigger the worst in them, they can give someone the wrong impression of them.

Emotional honesty can also make you vulnerable if a malicious person wants to find out your emotional triggers.

Arguing is good for you.
Yes because...

Releasing emotions is less stressful than letting them fester.

Emotions that aren't released don't just go away. If they are released naturally and openly with a loud but harmless shouting match, it will be much better than trying to suppress them and letting them turn into psychological problems, a grudge that might turn violent or the use of alcohol to relieve the emotional pain that then turns into an addiction.

Kira Birditt also believes that there is a finite amount of negative emotion that can be released all at once. If it isn't released, it seeps into daily life, causing more stress over the long term. This is described in the article as 'Essentially a ticking bomb versus one that's already released its power in a more gradual way.' (http://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/20100813/sc_livescience/argumentsaregoodforyourhealthstudysuggests)

A problem that is solved still has negative emotions attached to it that need to be released – the emotions will be attached to memories and flashbacks rather than current events.

Not everyone can afford counseling; your shrink can send you off because s/he has other patients people who are suffering from actual psychiatric/psychological problems. Research on counseling is inconclusive; whether it ever really works is a big question-mark.

No because...

There are other ways to harmlessly release emotions, such as in a counselling session.

Not everyone actually works like this emotionally, some people just forget about what they were arguing about.

A ticking time bomb can be defused before it goes off. At least there is a chance that the problem can be solved before anyone ever has a chance to argue about it, where an argument could make the practical situation worse.

Arguing is good for you.
No because...

Can affect reputation.

Arguments are embarrassing and immature. Even if the argument is in private, there will be someone who finds out about it, usually because they can hear the loud shouting and things being thrown. People who have to worry about their reputation will find it more stressful constantly trying to find situations where it is safe to argue.

Yes because...

Arguments are not all violent,loud and certainly do not always involve flinging objects. What is described on the right is what I would term as an internal domestic war.

I like argumentative people; they seem smart. We call them opinionated so as not to offend them; wouldn't want to get into an argument.

I also like the idea of having a reputation for winning arguments.
Who wouldn't want that?

Arguing is good for you.
No because...

Can upset children and sensitive people.

Even mild arguments can sound much worse than they are to children. They will believe they are unsafe and will be stressed out in general by loud noises.

In a workplace situation, hearing an argument out loud can put a nervous employee off work.

Yes because...

Children are the most argumentative people there are. with their questions and opinions on everything; plus the air of entitlement:

I want that

You can't have it

but I want it! *tantrum*

Sensitive people can also be very demanding thus argumentative;

The air-conditioning is too cold; lower it someone; please.

The other employees are feeling hot

But I feel like I'm freezing to death; help me (waaah! *speech on being the victim at every turn in his/her ife*)



Arguing is good for you.

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Dave

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