Gordon Brown’s defeat and resignation could have been prevented

Peter Mandelson has stated in his recent memoirs that senior members of the Labour Party believed that Gordon Brown's leadership and Labour's time in office was nearing the end.

Gordon Brown’s defeat and resignation could have been prevented

Yes because... No because...

Senior members of the Labour party believed their party was doomed last October.

However, Mr Brown was not replaced as leader. Alternative leaders should have been drawn up if Labour really wanted a chance of winning the General Election.

If Labour has called the General Election earlier, it may have been able to avoid defeat. David Cameron did not become a serious contender to Mr Brown straight away after becoming Conservative leader.

He could have called an election soon after the recession began when he was seen in a good light for saving the banks from collapse.

The party should have stopped its infighting and rallied around thier leader.

Brown was guilty of gaffe after gaffe and so the party had to let him go.
It didn't start with calling a supporter bigoted.
it didn't start with keeping Miliband despite incredible opposition and knowing David wanted to replace him. [[http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/article-23522766-brown-resists-calls-to-sack-troublemaker-miliband-as-his-popularity-hits-historic-low.do]]
it didn't start with bullying complaints from 10 Downing street.
it didn't start with classifying cannabis/marijuana as class B despite Professor Nutt's protests and evidence to the contrary. [[http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/8335189.stm]]
it didn't start with bad decisions not apologized for
it didn't start with...
need I go on?

Gordon Brown’s defeat and resignation could have been prevented

Yes because... No because...

Earlier election

If Brown had held a snap election, as he was expected to initially, Labour were expected to win quite comfortably and he could have had two more years as Prime Minister no matter what. By 2012, the recession would (hopefully!) be over and economic recovery would provide a big boost. The country would have recently held the Olympics, which would be likely to provide a brief boost to the party in power. Given Labour would have had four terms, it seems fairly likely they would have lost anyway (that's a long time to be in power) but they would nevertheless have enjoyed more time in power.

Gordon Brown’s defeat and resignation could have been prevented

Yes because... No because...

Senior Members of the party did not think that Labour was going to win the election last October

Unfortunately, for Gordon Brown, members of his own party predicted his downfall six months before the general election was called. Mr Brown was a different leader from Tony Blair. He was never elected by the public and he was not as popular. He was praised for acting quickly when the recession started but his popularity began to wain.

According to Peter Mandleson's memoirs, senior members of the Labour party believed that Labour was "fucked". If they believed this, then why did not put forward an alternative leader? Possibly, because of Brown's role in leading Britain through the financial crisis.

He states that Tony Blair had serious doubts about his successor. In 2008, Blair warned that there would be a change in leadership unless Brown's performance improved.

References: http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2010/jul/12/mandelson-brown-labour-party-finished
http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/wintour-and-watt/2010/jul/13/tonyblair-peter-mandelson

Gordon Brown’s defeat and resignation could have been prevented

Yes because... No because...

Blair thought that Grodon brown as "mad"

In the early days of their working relationship, Blair and Brown made a pact that Brown would take over when he stood down. But, in 2003, Blair drew up "Operation Teddy Bear" to split the treasury in two to weaken My Brown's power. This would mean that the then chancellor would lose countrol of departmental spending. Mr Mandleson was involved in this operation.

Blair was quoted as describing Mr Brown as "flawed, lacking perspective and having a paranoia about him".

References: http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/Politics/Peter-Mandelsons-Memoirs-Blair-Described-Brown-As-Mad-Bad-And-Dangerous/Article/201007215664760?lpos=Politics_Top_Stories_Header_4&lid=ARTICLE_15664760_Peter_Mandelsons_Memoirs%3A_Blair_Described_Brown_As_Mad%2C_Bad_And_Dangerous

Gordon Brown’s defeat and resignation could have been prevented

Yes because... No because...

Gordon Brown was not a good leader

Gordon Brown was one of the main reasons for Labour losing its election campaign. Voters look towards the party leader to decide if they can trust him of not. Gordon Brown did not come across well in the TV debates. David Cameron came across better. Mr Brown came third in all the debates.

He found the job of Prime Minister more difficult then he thought. He lacked chraisma and found it hard to put his ideas across.

Many in his own party did not beleive that he was a good leader including Geoff Hoon and Patricia Hewitt who unsuccessfully tried to lead a rebellion against him.

His presence according to pollsters, cost leader about forty seats in the election.

References: http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2010/jul/18/peter-mandelson-gordon-brown-rawnsley

Gordon Brown’s defeat and resignation could have been prevented

Yes because... No because...

Labour lost it's direction under Brown

Leadership contender, David Miliband has said that Labour lost its direction under Brown.

The party did not pay enough attention to issues such as crime and social behaviour. Mr Miliband also said that he was critical of Brown's time as chancellor especially the way he handled the 10p tax fisaco.

References: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/10629469

Gordon Brown’s defeat and resignation could have been prevented

Yes because... No because...

Any coalition agreement between the Labour Party and the Liberal Democrats required Gordon Brown's resignation

As recent reports have indicated, Nick Clegg made it clear that any agreement to form a coalition government between the Labour Party and the Liberal Democrats required, above all else, the resignation of Gordon Brown. Brown's position, Clegg believed, was untenable with the British general public. He was deeply disliked, however, not only amongst the general public but also with many members of his own party and many Liberal Democrat Members of Parliament. While the coalition deal did not in the event come to fruition, Brown's resignation was key for the deal to even be considered by Nick Clegg and his fellow Liberal Democrats.

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