Presents can legitimately be given after the season in order to buy them in the sale.

Easter Eggs cost less than half price after Easter Monday, are just as edible and many people have friends and relatives they can't meet during the actual Easter weekend for practical reasons, so they have a legitimate need to give the gifts a couple of days late. Does the gift count for as much if it is deliberately bought after the season to cut down on the cost, or is it cheap and hypocritical?

Presents can legitimately be given after the season in order to buy them in the sale.

Yes because... No because...

The intention is still the same.

The intention is still to give a gift to someone in order to celebrate a certain festival. If the intent was not to celebrate the festival, the gift could be given at a completely random time of year. If it was not to give that person a gift, you could do without the gift entirely or just give it to a random person.

This is risky as it depends on how late you give the gift and how much you genuinely want to give that person the gift as opposed to only when it is cheap.

In some gift-giving traditions, particularly in Japan, the price does actually matter.

Presents can legitimately be given after the season in order to buy them in the sale.

Yes because... No because...

Avoiding waste.

If the seasonal presents aren't bought soon, they will eventually be taken off the shelves and recycled/destroyed or perish if they are food items. This is a huge waste that makes no sense in a recession so it is better just to buy them and make use of them.

Presents can legitimately be given after the season in order to buy them in the sale.

Yes because... No because...

Opportunity to be more generous.

If the gifts are significantly reduced, you will have greater incentive and be more in a position to buy more of them for others.

Buying more items because they're cheaper isn't really saving when you can't store them up over a long period of time.

Presents can legitimately be given after the season in order to buy them in the sale.

Yes because... No because...

The timing is too important.

This is a very inflexible attitude when many people cannot celebrate festivals on time because of distance, lack of resource or inability to take time off work.

Many dates are arbitrary anyway - Christmas is unlikely to be the actual birth date of Christ - unless there are specific rules saying that they must coincide with a lunar event or a season change such as a solstice celebration.

Christmas presents are traditionally supposed to be given on Christmas day, Easter eggs on Easter Sunday. They are not supposed to have vague periods of time spanning a couple of weeks. Parents who hold 'birthday weeks' for their children instead of encouraging them to appreciate and anticipate their actual birthday are criticised. The day is ceremonial, it means something specific. The fact that the goods are in the sale is because they aren't really supposed to be bought then, they aren't useful for their purpose in the ceremony any more so the discount is the only incentive to buy them.

Presents can legitimately be given after the season in order to buy them in the sale.

Yes because... No because...

Cutting costs at someone else's expense.

Most festivals such as Christmas have hypocritical or dishonest aspects to them, such as explaining to children why they should go along with the more bizarre myths surrounding the festival and explaining to people you know why you bought gifts for some but not for others.

At least some of your intention is to save money at another person's expense - by deliberately giving them a gift that is probably not top quality, as it has spent longer on the shelves, and is late. Using someone else as a way for financial gain, even in such a small way, is a dishonest attitude that is unlikely to be in keeping with the season. It may also involve other dishonest acts such as lying about the price.

Debates > Presents can legitimately be given after the season in order to buy them in the sale.