Will improving access to contraception lower the number of teenage pregnancies?

Increasing numbers of girls are getting pregnant. This is damaging to them and to society. We may not like that they're having sex under the age of consent but the fact is they are. We've got to bite the bullet and give them access to contraception.

Will improving access to contraception lower the number of teenage pregnancies?

Yes because... No because...

Teenagers are obsessed with being sexual

Young people are obsessed with sex. They see it is a way of proving how adult they are, a way of having fun, and they want to try it because they’ve heard so much about it. They are also at an age when they think they know it all and won’t listen to others. They’re having spontaneous sex and they’re oblivious to risks. The very least we can do in this situation is to try and make contraception normal and easily accessible.

Young people do not listen to adults because too much focus has been given to meeting their needs. They think the world revolves around them when they should be taught the need to be good citizens. We don’t need to become more liberal with children, we need to become more strict. We need to start teaching them that they are responsible for their actions and will suffer if they do something wrong. Only then can we turn the tide of the type of behaviour that no civilised society should bear

Will improving access to contraception lower the number of teenage pregnancies?

Yes because... No because...

Huge burden on society

The problem of teenage pregnancies is one which affects all of society. Teenage pregnancies add a huge burden to housing and welfare – let alone the problems the child may encounter being raised by people who have little experience of the world and are little able to provide for him or her. Contraception is not the only answer but it is an answer. Making access to contraception more difficult would be a ludicrous idea. Why then, is the opposite equally ludicrous?

We are partly responsible for creating the problem by providing people who get pregnant with automatic housing assistance and a wealth of state handouts. Take away these and there will be much less reason for young people to get pregnant – or much more reason for them to choose other options than having the child themselves. By providing greater access to contraception we don’t deal with the cause but a symptom and this issue will not be dealt with until we start attacking its root.

Will improving access to contraception lower the number of teenage pregnancies?

Yes because... No because...

Young people need more help

The young people most at risk of getting pregnant are also the ones who are most vulnerable. By providing them with easy access to contraception we also get the opportunity to talk to them about safe sex and about other issues which may be bothering them. Without this access young people are lost to us and become feral.

Young people need to take responsibility for their own actions. They need to choose to seek help for if they don’t they wont be ready to make the difficult decisions necessary to change their lives. We can’t help those who don’t want to help themselves and if that means some people are lost to us and become feral, so be it.

Will improving access to contraception lower the number of teenage pregnancies?

Yes because... No because...

Lack of knowledge diminishes effectiveness of contraceptives

Teenagers cannot be expected to know about contraception when they begin sexual experimentation. Oftentimes contraception is used incorrectly, which causes them to be ineffective. Misinformed youth can often take unnecessary risks because they are unaware of the potential consequences of their actions. The best way to educate youth on this matter is to make contraceptives readily available, along with the necessary information that they need to know, so that they can make their own informed decisions and act responsibly.

For years now they have been taught this at school it is not a new idea. And it has had the adverse effect.

Will improving access to contraception lower the number of teenage pregnancies?

Yes because... No because...

understanding why teenagers turn to their desire

Young people feel trapped. They haven't got any freedom because mistakes they have made in the past have made adults around them question their trust. So to feel alive and feel like they can do something without being told they turn to their desire, wich includes boys. They'll find out that their friendsz have done something at everything turned out fine so they feel like they should try it and in the end, their situation turns out worst than their friendsz and they would end up pregnant but indefence adults just attack them after it and keep them in the house trapped and alwaysz angry at them when they find out and it would just make the the kids go out and do worst because it was lack of trust and freedom that brought them in that situation in the first place. I don't think that if you make contraception more available it would lower the level of teenage pregnancy because once the lack of trust and freedom starts they would turn to their desire more quickly because they know that a backup is available more easily.

Kids at ten know where babies come from. They have been given good (unnecessary) education and protection for years but they are having babies earlier all the time because silly society and parents allow it.And the taxpayer pays for it and the kids know it,they aint daft. Come on us maturer ones, what were we doing at aged 13 ? , the same but without the stupid sex education and no babies.

Will improving access to contraception lower the number of teenage pregnancies?

Yes because... No because...

Young people want to have kids

Do you have any studies to support this point?

Whilst some young people may get pregnant as a way of milking the system or to gain respect it is a huge generalisation to say that this is true of the majority. Many young people get pregnant when they don’t want to; by making access to contraception easier we ensure at least some of them aren’t sucked into a lifetime of poverty.

Most young people who get pregnant do so because they want to, not through lack of education. They know by getting pregnant they can get state handouts and a council house. In some deprived areas they also get respect for being pregnant. Educating them is not going to change that.

Will improving access to contraception lower the number of teenage pregnancies?

Yes because... No because...

We should focus on abstinence and education

It is unreasonable to expect that young people below the age of 16 will not have sex. The truth is that they do and we need to confront the reality of the situation rather than dealing with abstract notions of what should be so. It is also deeply unrealistic to imagine that young people will abstain from sex because they have been encouraged to do so. Evidence from America suggests such an approach is staggeringly unsuccessful.

We shouldn’t give people below the age of consent access to contraception, to do so implies a tacit approval of illegal behaviour. Instead we should teach people the dangers of getting pregnant and encourage abstinence as the best method for avoiding unwanted children.

Will improving access to contraception lower the number of teenage pregnancies?

Yes because... No because...

Can’t throw money at the problem

Money doesn’t solve all problems but if providing access to contraception prevents at least some pregnancies then it must be worth the investment. No single thing will solve this problem and access to contraception would only be provided in conjunction with other forms of education and treatment. However, clearly contraception does work and making it more accessible would mean more people used it. Ergo, fewer pregnancies.

Once again the government imagines a problem can be solved simply by throwing money at it. We need to look at why young people choose to get pregnant, we need to find out the best ways of getting through to them the dangers of getting pregnant and we need to provide better access to mentors and guardians so young people decide to learn from people who’ve been through it before rather than their peers who aren’t the most wise.

Will improving access to contraception lower the number of teenage pregnancies?

Yes because... No because...

Lack of access to contraceptives is not the main reason for unprotected sex

While we should try and alter people's attitudes towards sex ,to do so without improving access to condoms means that there is one area where government or societies provision is falling short and possibly causing teen pregnancies to rise . By at improving access to contraception we're at least using all the options society has at it's disposal and hitting the problem of teenage pregnancies with everything we've got so the number of teenage pregancies is as small as it can be.

In the instances where unprotected sex happens it is usually because the parties involved have taken alcohol or other drugs, or else the man thinks it is 'uncool' to use protection. Increasing the number of condoms won't prevent these incidences from occurring - they will always happen anyway.

What we need to do is tackle some of the wider issues and problems affecting youth, and trying to alter their attitudes.

Will improving access to contraception lower the number of teenage pregnancies?

Yes because... No because...

poor access to contracptives is not the main problem

having read articles and watched documentaries on the subject, i completely disagree with the subject of this debate. Not having access to contraceptives is not the major cause of teenage pregnancy. Apart from all the other 'no' points, another contributor is the immature attitude of teenagers have to sex, with excuses ranging from 'I forgot to take the pill' to ' i didn't think you could get pregnant if you just did it once'.

the fact is teenagers know all about their rights and not about their responsibility. 'Yes you may get away with underage sex but do you fully understand the consequence of your actions?' and let's face it, Sex Education in Secondary schools doesn't really touch on the subject.

Making contraception easier to access shouldn't be the major priority, what should be the priority is making teenagers fully understand the consequences of unprotected sex or even underage sex...... from getting pregnant to STIs and STDs.

Will improving access to contraception lower the number of teenage pregnancies?

Yes because... No because...

No it has proved opposite.

This assumes that sex education is the main source of information for children on sex. I am not certain this is the case - sex features so much in contempory culture it is as likely that most of their knowledge comes from films, computer games or else from the internet as from any formal education. If this is the case then taking away the education may simply leave the children without any information they can trust while still having plenty of information on sex.

Since sex education and access to contraception was introduced a decade ago the problem has deteriorated. They know what its about earlier than us older ones did. A 15yr old girl this week said she did not know the father was 11 although she knew his school was a primary school. She knew he was 11 but its all too easy now and society has let them know that its ok, and someone else will pay for the child, the taxpayer.Because of the misguided sex education it has given the children the acceptability to do it. They know they can get contraception they are taught it, but choose not to because they can. Can our govenors not put their childish memories back into gear ? and recall their way of learning ? because the system we have now is'nt.

Will improving access to contraception lower the number of teenage pregnancies?

Yes because... No because...

It gives them wrong information.

Improving access to contraception does not have to have anything to do with the information they are given - this can be separately changed surely?

Improving access to contraception in itself is unlikely to give any individual child a particular message - will they really know that their access is improving?

Having the possibility of contraception as you say may lead to a belief that they can have sex and ignore the consequences (which is understandable because most of the time it is true) but if this is the reality then how are they getting the wrong impression? If teenagers don't have access to contraception then there is a much bigger danger that they believe that they do have access (because they know of its existence and their is information about it all over the place) when in reality they don't.

They should be taught to learn refrain because of the possibilities. As it is we are just saying yes you can do it.

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